5 Reasons to Celebrate GDPR

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25th May 2018 is etched onto the minds of businesses as the date where all data has to be in order. GDPR is approaching fast.

 

Is it a big task? Yes, of course.

Should you be worried? Only if you’re doing nothing.

Is it an opportunity? Absolutely!

 

It’s an Opportunity to Contact

Yes, it’s ironic. The very fact that some people may not want to be contacted anymore gives you a reason to contact them.  That’s a fantastic opportunity. You are delivering good news – that you take their privacy seriously and that you only ever want them to send information that will add value to their day. That’s better than many other messages they will have had from you in the past. As long as you are/have been clear and transparent with opt-ins and you can track this, you can keep them on file. Win-Win.

 

Better data means truer results.

So, yes, your data count may come down by quite a lot. But how engaged is your database? You’d expect your active customer database to be vibrant and active but what about your prospects? The chances are you have mailed them more than they’d like and if they haven’t replied by now, well, I think you know the answer. So, how does that look when you’re reporting campaign results? If you can weed out the prospects that don’t want to be contacted, your response rate will actually improve. Don’t worry about those you’ve lost. They’ll be grateful to you and chances are they’ll find you again if they have a need.

 

Get the edge over your Competitors

Who would you rather do business with? The company who respected your right to privacy? Or the one who didn’t get around to it? The one who saw it as an opportunity to check in with you and see if there is still an opportunity there? Or the one who just did nothing and hoped for the best?  GDPR is not just a new legal requirement. It’s a customer experience opportunity and something that should become regular practice. This could be one of the best incentives you’ll ever have to sharpen up your data strategy.

 

Underhand Tactics Cost

There’s something reassuring about knowing that the businesses who disregard data privacy will have bigger penalties. Although getting it right for your business will initially take effort, the overall benefit for us all as businesses and consumers makes it worthwhile. GDPR is a customer experience improvement that we all benefit from and whilst it’s a high cost for unintentional slip-ups, it’s a fair one for blatant disregard.

 

Inform your Strategy

Use the opportunity well and you could find out more about what makes them tick and where exactly they are in the buying journey. You can discover content needs, preferred communication, other interests just for starters. Basically, segmentation and targeting insight that will help you to freshen up your conversation with them and move them along the pipeline.

From our point of view, a Dynamics 365 CRM system with true, segmented and up to date data will always provide sharper insights for operational efficiency and opportunity spotting. With a platform so good at bringing information from around the organisation into single customer views, it means precision and process that will convert.

Want to know more about GDPR? Watch our GDPR Q&A webinar or drop us an email at info@redspire.co.uk for more information on how Dynamics 365 can help.

GDPR, a catalyst for positive change

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There are two ways to look at the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR).

For businesses already digitally underway, it’s another important tick in the box for compliance and best practice. They may even identify a few opportunities to enhance what they’re already doing.

However, if you’re in a business that’s been dragging its digital heels, it could be the difference between growth and being left behind. The businesses in your sector that identify the opportunities of GDPR will not only comply with it and avoid heavy penalties, they’ll reap the benefits of having been forced to look at their processes.

Yes, there will be those who simply just tick the boxes and essentially plaster over the cracks that GDPR has revealed but that is a massive missed opportunity. If businesses that are digitally behind don’t untangle their existing processes, they are adding knots and loops to deal with further down the line as more and more data sources demand more and more processes.

In contrast, the businesses who use the time between now and May next year to properly review their processes and systems can look at their overall digital fitness and get an edge over the competition who haven’t bothered.

Here’s how:

Mapping the policies and processes that surround how you use and collect data will give every department ideas for business development.

Better data means better relationships. Not only that, it will ensure a better start to your customer journey as people will be parting with their data with more awareness of exactly how it will be used. People who don’t want to engage won’t provide their data. So, no wasted time chasing, and no resentment before you even begin communicating.

Technology can power most of the internal change needed and can, in the case of Dynamics 365, join up all the disparate systems in a business. That brings a massive benefit; a 360-degree view of every customer. Suddenly it’s easier to engage with customers with the right information at the right time as well as have end-to-end data governance. When all that information is in one place with the intelligence of Dynamics 365 wrapped around it, it becomes more powerful.

Reporting and Decision Making become so much easier when the data can interact across departments on the back of active data.

Staff Adoption of the new GDPR processes could be the difference between compliance and a huge fine. It stacks up that the easier staff find the new processes, the less likely non-compliance is. So again, the businesses that look to consolidate their systems into one familiar space are already ahead of the game.

How much of an opportunity do you see for your business as we march towards the GDPR?

Watch our essential GDPR webinar for more information.

5 FAQs About GDPR

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It’s only 11 months until the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulations come into force (25th May 2018).

Our webinar this week is taking a look at how you can start your planning process for GDPR.

First though, here is a rundown of our 5 most frequently asked questions. If any of this is new to you, or this is as far as your knowledge already goes, please do join us on Thursday!

 

What is The EU GDPR?

Standing for The General Data Protection Regulations, GDPR is the EU’s regulation of data processing for its citizens. It applies to every country holding and using data of EU members and replaces the inconsistent and out of date approaches of individual countries. It’s a binding legislative act that will replace a 20-year EU directive that first came into place when web technology was still very new. The GDPR will address security vulnerabilities that have arisen due to the digital lives we all now lead. The big aim is to enable a secure flow of data that individuals have greater control and visibility over by improving consent processes.

The GDPR applies to organisations located within the EU as well as businesses out-with, that supply goods or services to (or monitor the behaviour of) EU data subjects.  It’s important to remember that this isn’t just about you and your systems. Your suppliers will also need to play by the rules or you could still be fined.

 

Does it apply to my business before and after Brexit?

Come May 2018, we’re still part of the EU. So it will apply to every UK business. After that, it makes sense to comply anyway. If you are selling goods or services to EU members/citizens then you need to meet your obligations. If you’re operating only within the UK, the UK government has said it will probably follow suit.

 

What are the main headlines?

Storage – You need to be able to clearly define what personal data is stored, how it’s collected and how it’s used.

Processes – Businesses will have to be able to provide evidence of what type of data processing is carried out, how data is used, the flow of data throughout and out-with the organisation, access to data and protections at each step.

Consent – Consent agreements must be separate, simple and dedicated and recorded against each customer. Double opt in’s will become the standard, opt-in boxes cannot be ticked by default, and soft opt-in’s will become a thing of the past. People must understand why they are giving permission and be able to revoke it easily (even that must be recorded back to the customer file). The ‘right to be forgotten’ falls into this category too. If your existing data meets the new consent rules, it should be fine. If you’re in doubt, you should inform your databases and give them their right to be deleted.

Privacy by design – Just as it sounds; data protection should be part of the foundation of designing data systems rather than an addition.

Data Protection Roles – Depending on your business, you may be required to appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO) under the GDPR. Public bodies are included in this as well as businesses that carry out large scale systematic monitoring of individuals (e.g. online behaviour tracking) and businesses that process large scale data relating to special categories. Regardless of whether or not you are obliged to appoint a DPO, you will need to ensure you have the staff numbers and understanding that you need to meet your GDPR obligations.

 

What’s the price of non-compliance?

Substantial. Technical related non-compliance e.g. impact assessments, breach notifications and certifications will attract fines up to an amount that is the GREATER of €10 million or 2% of global annual turnover (revenue). Key provision non-compliance will attract fines up to the GREATER of €20 million or 4% of global annual turnover. And that’s before we talk about reputational damage.

Data controllers within your business will be legally obliged to notify the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) of any data breach within 72 hours of its occurrence.  Note that if you are a public authority or you regularly monitor data on a large scale, you will need to appoint a Data Protection Officer, something worth doing regardless.

 

Business v CRM Responsibility

The GDPR offers an opportunity for cleaner databases, better quality lead pipelines, lower cost per acquisition, more accurate forecasting and better ongoing CRM.

Your CRM system should meet GDPR standards by implementing privacy by design and default in build processes. However, it’s a joint responsibility. Whilst Microsoft (and we, as partners) should ensure your tech is GDPR compliant with access controls and privacy functions, you must also ensure your processes and people are also compliant.  Dynamics 365 is already well prepared in its set up for GDPR so speak with your Microsoft Partner for further support and information.

Watch our essential GDPR webinar for more information.

Your Microsoft Partner’s Role In Your GDPR Transition

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Redspire is a Microsoft CRM solutions specialist and a Microsoft strategic Partner, which means we are qualified and trusted by Microsoft to deliver their solutions.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a big focus for us right now. Less than a year away, it will replace The Data Protection Act and means significant changes for how businesses handle data not least the severe fines for non-compliance. Even when the UK is out of Europe, non-conformity and data breaches can result in fines of up to €20m or 4% of your annual worldwide turnover.

There’s currently a lot of IT complexity out there. GDPR is an opportunity to streamline that technology architecture. Microsoft Dynamics 365 is already well prepared and meets those needs, it not only helps you to comply but crucially, demonstrates that compliance.

Can your Microsoft CRM Partner support your business and people journey to GDPR compliance? The rules of finding a CRM partner still apply.

A good GDPR CRM partner should be:

  • Looking at the role of data in your organisation, finding the changes GDPR will enforce, and identifying the edits and customisations to enable them.
  • Advising on role, record and field-based security for your team, reducing the risks associated with administrative rights.
  • Helping you evaluate how you answer points on consent, data purpose, and data retention.
  • Reviewing what triggers may be required throughout your system to maximise Dynamics 365’s detection and data breach reporting.
  • Pointing out the areas where Dynamics 365 will maximise the opportunity of compliance with GDPR such as turning double opt-in and lower sign up volumes into better engagement and conversion.
  • Knowledgeable in every facet of GDPR, of your current system(s) and integrations.
  • Following a process for supporting you through GDPR based on experience of your sector.
  • Prepared to continue to work with you as you get to grips with how it works in practice.

Watch our essential GDPR webinar for more information.